How Long Do Russian Blue Cats Live

How Long Do Russian Blue Cats Live

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The Russian Blue is a cat breed that will come in colors varying from a light shimmering silver to a darker, slate grey. They develop close bonds with their owners and are searched for as pets due to their personalities, beauty, and coat. It really is their short, dense coat which has been the hallmark of the Russian breed for greater than a century. The dense coat stands out from the body plus one can draw patterns in the coat that will stay until one smoothes them out again.

How long do Russian Blue cats live

Russian Blues have an average lifespan of around 10–20 years; some have even lived up to a maximum of 25 years.

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Russian Blue cat personality

This is a well-behaved cat that is easy to train. Or, rather, it easily trains its people. It enjoys a good game of fetch and will keep the game going longer than you may have time for, and you will make time because the Russian Blue is known for actually appearing hurt when it has been ignored. Elegant, and reserved, this cat is also very playful and loves to chase after toys or sunbeams.

How Long Do Russian Blue Cats Live

The Russian Blue can spend hours amusing itself and does not mind an awful lot if it is left at home alone for the day, but it will be very happy to see you when you do arrive. This cat makes for an excellent companion, constantly following its owners about, and generally preferring one human above all others in the family. It should be added that the Russian Blue gets along with most everyone, including children. Their love of human company extends to impishly clowning to help calm a crying baby, and showing sympathy when their people get the blues by patting the face of the person.

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One of the Blue Russian’s vulnerabilities is its tendency to be startled easily. They also have a natural proclivity to shyness and nervousness around strangers and in strange environments. If it is true that this breed was once the target of fur hunters (as some say), this would easily account for their caution and quick-footedness. They would have had to move fast at the slightest sound to quite literally preserve their own skins.

This breed does not like change, preferring for things to be uniform and predictable. It can be thrown off when dinnertime is altered and is nit-picky about hygiene. It will not even enter its litter box if it is dirty. In the early years, this breed developed a reputation at shows for being difficult to work with because of traits like these. The Russian Blue was gentle and happy at home, but it shows it was visibly discontent and temperamental. Popularity declined and fewer Russian Blues were being shown until breeders focused on improving the attitudes of the breed through selective breeding and behavior management (e.g., soft music, recording of show noises, crystals, herbal remedies). This commitment to the breed paid off, and today the Russian Blue is a happy participant at cat shows.

Russian Blue cat hypoallergenic

There was evidence that Russian blues produce less of the glycoprotein Fel d 1 which is as we’ve said is one of the most frequent allergens of cats. This fact, if true, will significantly minimise the hypersensitive reaction you might have to the cat.